Costco Officially Announces It Will Not Be Selling Monsanto RoundUp This Season

While the Internet has been abuzz with claims that Costco had already dumped Monsanto’s flagship pesticide product, RoundUp, a spokesperson on behalf of the corporation only just announced on May 29 that the company is not planning to sell the product this season.

Since Feb 1, 2019, I was in touch with Costco representatives to confirm or deny the reports that the company will not be carrying Roundup. Finally, after repeated attempts over the last four months Corporate Communications on behalf of Costco Management, at Costco Wholesale Corporation stated the following: “Costco is constantly reviewing its (product) lineup, and is not planning to sell RoundUp this season.”

The timing is not surprising, given that Monsanto, now owned by Bayer AG, just lost three court cases in which the product was alleged to cause cancer.

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NHS 1948 — 2018 Thank You For Seventy Years Of Service

#ThankYouNHS70
#ThankYouNHS70

Please Join me in thanking the wonderful people who work within the UK’s National Health Service. The NHS marks its 70th Anniversary today: 5th July 1948 — 5th July 2018. Please add your personal thanks, by commenting here, sharing this post, and using the hashtag: #ThankYouNHS70. Read More

You Can Smell When Someone’s Sick—Here’s How

The curious case of a woman who can smell Parkinson’s reminds us our noses are our first defense against illness.

Joy Milne (right) was able to correctly identify people with Parkinson’s disease based solely on their smell.

I’m sick, and I don’t smell right. I don’t mean that my nose isn’t working—though this cold has me stuffed up. Instead, my own body odor seems somehow different, sour and unfamiliar.

I’m far from the first person to notice this nasty side effect. Scientists have found that dozens of illnesses have a particular smell: Diabetes can make your urine smell like rotten apples, and typhoid turns body odor into the smell of baked bread.

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The New Hippocratic Oath: The Physician’s Pledge

The Hippocratic oath is a 2,500-year-old pledge doctors take outlining the professional duties and ethical principles the profession holds sacred. The first modern version of the Hippocratic oath was adopted in 1948. The version released in November 2017, by the World Medical Association in Chicago took two years to finalise and is the ancient text’s first ever major update. A new name was proposed as well: “The Physician’s Pledge.”

The Physician’s Pledge

As a member of the medical profession:

I solemnly pledge to dedicate my life to the service of humanity;
The health and well-being of my patient will be my first consideration;
I will respect the autonomy and dignity of my patient;
I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
I will practise my profession with conscience and dignity and in accordance with good medical practice;
I will foster the honour and noble traditions of the medical profession;
I will give to my teachers, colleagues, and students the respect and gratitude that is their due;
I will share my medical knowledge for the benefit of the patient and the advancement of healthcare;
I will attend to my own health, well-being, and abilities in order to provide care of the highest standard;
I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
I make these promises solemnly, freely, and upon my honour.

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CDC Is A Vaccine Company, Owns 56 Vaccines — A Grave Conflict Of Interest

Two recent events have forced a glaring spotlight on the $30 billion a year vaccine industry: First, President Donald Trump announced a plan to establish a commission chaired by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. (RFK) to investigate vaccine safety and scientific integrity. The second, again featuring RFK, is when he and actor Robert De Niro announced a $100,000 reward to any scientist (or anyone else) who could conclusively prove the safety of mercury (in the form thimerosal) in vaccines.

Both events have unleashed a veritable storm of fury from the mainstream media, many of whom label both De Niro and RFK “vaccine skeptics” or “anti-vaccine,” despite the men’s repeated objections and insistence that they are pro-vaccine and dutifully had all their children vaccinated.

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