9 Anti-Cancer Foods You Cannot Ignore

With modern lifestyles, people are exposed to multiple carcinogenic agents on a daily basis. It is hence no wonder that cancer rates are soaring. To keep far away from this terrifying disease, below is a list of cancer foods that cannot be ignored.

Flavonoid-Rich Berries

These berries include currants, cherries, cranberries, hawthorn berries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries and strawberries. As powerful antioxidants, flavonoids can be more potent than traditional antioxidants like vitamin C and E, beta-carotene, selenium and zinc. And antioxidants are well-known to be crucial in the prevention of cancer.

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‘Less Meat, Less Heat’: Could Changing Your Diet Save The Planet?

When we choose the types of foods that we eat, we are often thinking about what would be the healthiest choices for our bodies.

While this is perfectly acceptable and the best thing we can be doing for our own health, it is also important to consider the impact our food choices are having on the planet.

The agricultural industry is the biggest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the world, accounting for between 19-29% off all global greenhouse gas emissions. Livestock production (including transportation and feed) accounts for a staggering 80% of the sector’s emissions. That’s more than the emissions for all planes, trucks, cars and boats combined!

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No Matter Where: The Documentary

Each year 200,000 people die from medical errors in American hospitals. There are a number of reasons for these mistakes, but everyone agrees the number would be much lower if doctors shared records. In this Internet age, we assume doctors anywhere can pull up our charts, but the truth is most have no way to do this.

At first glance, it might be an obvious conclusion that since many clinical practices use computers to record information and to look up past records, and since hospitals also use computers to look up information, these clinical practices must be exchanging data among themselves and among hospitals in the region. Read More

James Colquhoun: What Is The Definition Of Wellness?

Once upon a time, health was commonly defined as merely the absence of disease. In fact, in many parts of the world today, many health professionals still practice through this outdated and antiquated paradigm. The dominant healthcare culture tends to view the body as a machine, capable of black and white states of health and illness.

This approach can be helpful if you have a condition that is quantifiable and measurable. (Think, for example, of infections, trauma and critical disease.) However, the issue is that this view of health doesn’t account for other factors that also affect our health in an indirect, unquantifiable way, such as sleep quality, stress, diet and emotional well-being.

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Dr Libby Weaver — Hunger Vs Appetite: What’s The Difference

Hunger and appetite are two very different things. Hunger is the physical need for food whereas appetite is the desire for food. Hunger occurs with low levels of glucose in your blood, several hours after eating – it is a protective mechanism that ensures your body is adequately fuelled. Appetite is the conditioned response to food – it is a sensory reaction to the look or smell of food. It is appetite that can lead “your eyes to be bigger than your stomach.”

Our appetite is closely linked with our behaviour but also takes cues from our digestive tract, brain and fatty tissue. Having an increased appetite or having the feeling of wanting to “eat everything in your path”, in my clinical experience stems from your biochemistry and/or an emotional connection you have formed with food.

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