Jennifer Brea: What Happens When You Have A Disease Doctors Can’t Diagnose?

Five years ago, TED Fellow Jennifer Brea became progressively ill with myalgic encephalomyelitis, commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness that severely impairs normal activities and on bad days makes even the rustling of bed sheets unbearable. In this poignant talk, Brea describes the obstacles she’s encountered in seeking treatment for her condition, whose root causes and physical effects we don’t fully understand, as well as her mission to document through film the lives of patients that medicine struggles to treat. Read More

What Would Happen If You Didn’t Sleep?

In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. Claudia Aguirre shows what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep. Read More

How Stress Can Make You Sick

Our hard-wired stress response is designed to gives us the quick burst of heightened alertness and energy needed to perform our best. But stress isn’t all good. When activated too long or too often, stress can damage virtually every part of our body. Sharon Horesh Bergquist gives us a look at what goes on inside our body when we are chronically stressed.

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This is the Real Reason Why Wheat is Making You Sick!

You’ve probably heard about the gluten-free diet. Those who have a gluten allergy or sensitivity, and even those who avoid it just in case have sworn off products containing gluten, including wheat. But some evidence shows that it may not be gluten that Americans should be worried about when it comes to wheat. The real culprit is far worse.

The protocol for wheat harvesting in the United States is to drench the wheat field with an herbicide called Roundup several days before the harvesters work through the fields, as dead wheat plants are easier on the farm equipment and allow for an earlier, easier and bigger harvest.

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Salvatore Iaconesi: What Happened When I Open-Sourced My Brain Cancer

When artist Salvatore Iaconesi was diagnosed with brain cancer, he refused to be a passive patient — which, he points out, means “one who waits.” So he hacked his brain scans, posted them online, and invited a global community to pitch in on a “cure.” This sometimes meant medical advice, and it sometimes meant art, music, emotional support — from more than half a million people. Read More